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Archive for the ‘CFP’ Category

[Air-L] CFP: Rethinking the Culture of Busyness and IT: NSF-sponsored symposium

In CFP on November 29, 2010 at 8:57 pm

 

Gmail – [Air-L] CFP: Rethinking the Culture of Busyness and IT: NSF-sponsored symposium – kyun4zzing@gmail.com

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Special Issue: Social Media in News Discourse

In CFP on November 27, 2010 at 8:57 pm

Electronic Journal of Communication / La Revue Electronique de Communication

Special Issue: Social Media in News Discourse

As professional media producers pay more attention to social media, from personal blog entries and tweets to Facebook updates and YouTube videos, journalists are faced with numerous decisions. Among these are how to integrate personal and often-relationship-focused media with the public and fact-centred discourse of the news.

This special issue of the Electronic Journal of Communication invites contributions exploring the conventions that are emerging around the use of social media by news organisations, and the implications of those conventions for public communication. Contributions will have as their central concern whether or not the encounter with social media is changing aspects of news journalism.

Possible questions arising from this concern include: How do the forms of personal expression to be found in social media translate into news discourse? What authority or status as knowers is given in the news to voices from various social media? How are specific kinds of social media typically made use of within news discourse? How are journalism’s ethical frameworks applied to these media? to what extent is social media content decontextualised from its online social context when used by journalism? Are social media texts produced within news organisations also used in news texts?

Papers should be 5000-7500 words in length and submitted electronically to the guest editor, Donald Matheson, at donald.matheson@canterbury.ac.nz<mailto:donald.matheson@canterbury.ac.nz>. Deadline for completed manuscripts is 20 December 2010. The issue is scheduled for publication in the second half of 2011.

Authors are welcome to contact the guest editor to discuss proposed papers or related matters.

CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS: Race/Gender/Media–September 15

In CFP on July 20, 2010 at 1:32 pm

Race/Gender/Media: Considering diversity across audiences, content, and producers (Third edition), edited by Rebecca Ann Lind. Seeking a variety of chapters representing all paradigms (critical, rhetorical, social scientific, etc), focusing on all media (new and old), looking at all aspects of media (production, reception, text), and looking at all types of content (comic books, video games, newspapers, film, internet, etc). Proposals preferred by September 15, 2010, chapters due by January 1, 2011. Flexibility possible, with prior arrangement.

For full details go to http://tigger.uic.edu/~rebecca/RGM3e.html (case sensitive), or email Rebecca Lind at rebecca@uic.edu

Ambient Media Association (AMEA)’s CFP

In CFP on July 13, 2010 at 10:09 am

An interesting concept and organization: “Ambient Media”

Description of the Workshop

The medium is the message! And the message was transmitted via a single distinguishable media such as television, the Web, the radio, or books. In the age of ubiquitous and pervasive computation, where the information through a distributed interlinked network of devices the question, “what is content in the age of ambient media?” becomes more and more of importance. Ambient media are embedded throughout the natural environment of the consumer – in his home, in his car, in restaurants, and on his mobile device. Predominant example services are smart wallpapers in homes, location based services, RFID based entertainment services for children, or intelligent homes. The distribution of the medium throughout the natural environment implies a paradigm change of how to think about content. Until recently, content was identified as single entities to information – a video stream, audio stream, TV broadcast. However, in the age of ambient media, the notion of content extends from the single entity thinking towards a plethora of sensor networks, smart devices, personalized services, and media embedded in the natural environment of the user. The user actively participates and co-designs media experience with his location based input. Initiatives as the smart Web considering location based tagging for web-pages underline this development. This multidisciplinary workshop aims to answer to the challenges how to select, compose, and generate ambient content; how to present ambient content?; how to re-use ambient content and learning experiences?; what is the characteristics of ambient media, its content, and technology?; and what are ambient media in terms of story-telling and art? And finally, how do ambient media create business and value? How can ambient media be integrated into business processes and strategies? Semantics plays a crucial role in the generation of ambient media content. It can be seen as the glue between the raw data and the ambient media. Therefore we are interested to see innovative ideas how data can be (semi-)automatically be interpreted and translated into media presentations. The workshop aims at a series, and at the creation of a think-tank of creative thinkers coming from technology, art, human-computer interaction, and social sciences, that are interested in glimpsing the future of semantic ambient intelligent empowered media technology.

Ambient Media Association (AMEA)

Call for NCA Panel Participants: The Discourses of Global Warming

In CFP on January 5, 2010 at 2:55 pm

I am putting together a panel focusing on the discourses of global warming. Despite what appears to be a general consensus of the scientific community that anthropogenic (human-produced) carbon emissions are fundamentally responsible for the rising of temperatures world-wide, there are substantial and vocal counter-arguments. These include assertions that the science of global warming is faked or poorly conceived or alarmist.

In addition, there are other communication factors which impact the science of global warming, all informed by the premise that scientific discourse is profoundly rhetorical and driven, both in its execution and dissemination, by ideology and pathos. These include the discursive strategies used between experts as well as those used by climate scientists as they advocate individual perspectives, with varying degrees of success, to the lay public. I welcome paper proposals related to the topic of global warming as a scientific controversy and a rhetorical construct.

Proposals which integrate the “building bridges” conference theme would also be welcomed, although not a pre-requisite for inclusion. If you are interested in this panel, please email a paper title and abstract of no more than 250 words, as well as your name, title, affiliation and contact information by February 1, 2010 to cek2@psu.edu. Please also indicate if you would be willing to serve as a chair or respondent or if you know of anyone interested in doing so.

Colleen E. Kelley, Ph.D. Associate Professor School of HSS Penn State Erie, The Behrend College 170 Irvin Kochel Center 4951 College Drive Erie, PA 16563-1501 cek2@psu.edu 814 898 6392 (office) 814 881 8803

[Air-L] cfp – Electronic Journal of Communication – social media in news discourse

In CFP, Journalism, New Media on December 16, 2009 at 8:24 pm

Electronic Journal of Communication/La Revue Electronique de Communication

Special issue: Social media in news discourse

As professional media producers pay more attention to social media, from personal blog entries and tweets to Facebook updates and YouTube videos, journalists are faced with numerous decisions. Among these are how to integrate personal and often-relationship-focused media with the public and fact-centred discourse of the news.

This special issue of the Electronic Journal of Communication invites contributions exploring the conventions that are emerging around the use of social media by news organisations, and the implications of those conventions for public communication. Contributions will have as their central concern whether or not the encounter with social media is changing aspects of news journalism.

Possible questions arising from this concern include:

how do the forms of personal expression to be found in social media translate into news discourse?
what authority or status as ‘knowers’ is given in the news to voices from various social media?
how are specific kinds of social media typically made use of within news discourse?
how are journalism’s ethical frameworks applied to these media?
to what extent is social media content decontextualised from its online social context when used by journalism?
are social media texts produced within news organisations also used in news texts?

Papers should be 5000-7500 words in length and submitted electronically to the guest editor, Donald Matheson, at donald.matheson@canterbury.ac.nz. Deadline for completed manuscripts is 20 November 2010. The issue is scheduled for publication in the second half of 2011.